June 24, 2010

Hiatus

I'm taking a bit of a hiatus while on vacation in Michigan.  Just me, a lake and a stack of books. 

About fifteen years ago my family rented a cabin in the woods for two weeks.  At the end of the first week my mom, brother and I drove home as school was starting and my dad was staying a week longer with a friend.  During our stay mom read Silence of the Lambs and left it there as a "must read".  My father took the bait and read the book in a 24 hour time period.  Unfortunately, there was a 48 hour gap between us leaving and his friend arriving.  During those two nights dear old dad slept with his fillet knife under his pillow.

I have learned from my father's mistakes and the scariest thing I will be reading about is Rebecca's Mrs. Danvers.  

Rebecca 1940

You had me at Hitchcock.  And if that wasn't enough you can also throw in the great Laurence Olivier and Joan Fontaine.  These three mainstays of Golden Hollywood are all involved with the mysterious Rebecca.  

Rebecca is the story of an unnamed girl who marries the wealthy Maxim de Winter who was ruined after the death of his first wife Rebecca.  Upon entering the estate of Manderly the second Mrs. de Winter is constantly being compared to the first wife of that name and is petrified by her maid and still devotee of Rebecca, Mrs. Danvers.

Rebecca was filmed in an eerie light making the most mundane things creepy, such as the opening of a window, a portrait in the hall or an embroidered pillow case, goosebumps were sent up my spine.

While I have never read the book, I've seen this movie many times and still manages to catch me off guard.  I think this is because there are gaps of questioning left in the conclusion, leaving this storyline as unfinished or unsolved, as somethings must stay unearthed.        

Cranford


Cranford
Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell is a collection of short stories surrounding the small town of Cranford and the eccentric women who live there.

As I said, Cranford is a small town which is high in the population of female.  In the first section of the book, every male who enters the town drops like flies making it feel jinxed or like an old fashioned sorority.

Elizabeth Gaskell's novel is a sequence of short stories that all intertwine.  I'm typically not a short story reader so it took me a while to get into it and go with the flow.  Although, once there Cranford is enchanting!  All the characters are so lively that one can not help but fall in love, which is odd because most of the females are against that.

You cannot write a review without speaking of Miss Matty.  She is a kind old soul who while should seem a woman with much wisdom, she is in fact a nieve child-like girl who everyone coddles and adores because of her sweet nature.  I won't say much in fear that I could give too much away, but an example of this is when Matty's companion is engaged to be married but worries about mentioning it in case it were to upset her and devises a plan so everything benefits the surrounding persons.

My favorite and what I felt to be the most entertaining stories is of Lady Glenmire's appearance.  Believed to be  the highest of society with the residence in town all in a tizzy over the preparations only to find that she is no different from themselves.

The running around reminded me of a Faulty Towers episode particularly the one where "The Germans" visit the hotel.   Really, when I think about it the majority of these stories could have been a highly sophisticated Faulty Towers.


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June 21, 2010

Prince Caspian

Prince Caspian (The Chronicles of Narnia, #2)
The Pevensie children return to Narnia to find their castle Cair Paravel in ruins, and the peaceful Narnia they had left is now corrupt by King Miraz,who has usurped the throne from his nephew and true leader of Narnia Caspian. It is now up to Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy, and with the help of Aslan to set things right.

Lucy and her vivid imagination and determination to believe enables her to see Aslan first, convincing her siblings that he has returned being beneficial to their quest. Cheers and hope are sounded by his return uplifting the readers heart. This is until, Peter must duel Miraz and then one is holding their breath.

I must admit, I had problems with Caspian, not because he was unfair or a poor leader but because I can picture no one else except the High King Peter ruling over Narnia. But if that's my only complaint, C.S. Lewis has done his job.

I cannot end without mentioning Reepicheap, his loyalty and determination to participate and assist with his skills is endearing and I almost cried at the loss of his tail. (I hope that doesn't sound pathetic). Overall, this was a very enjoyable read which I would recommend to anyone who is still young at heart.


View all my reviews

The Huge TBR Readathon Ends


Kristen at Bookworming in the 21st Century hosted the first Huge TBR Readathon, a week long event lasting from June 14 -20.  My reading was very sporadic during the week, an hour here an hour there, therefore I'm not sure how many hours I actually spent reading but I think it was 20ish.

Here's what I accomplished
  1. Prince Caspian by C.S. Lewis -- Completed
  2. Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell -- Completed
  3. Behind a Mask by Louisa May Alcott -- 21% completed Kindle Version
I think that makes for a very successful week.  Thanks to Kristen for hosting this great event!

June 18, 2010

Femme Fatale Fridays: Fanny Dashwood

"A Femme Fatale, translating to "Deadly Woman" in french, is an alluring, seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire. Often this leads them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations." ~ Wikipedia

 I first discovered this class of women from 1930s and 40s film noir several years ago and was seduced by their charm and cunning minds.  I then began to see them popping up in novels I read, even my favorites like Gone with the Wind and Wuthering Heights.  This  weekly post is to highlight/celebrate/condemn these sultry and conniving ladies in literature.



While Fanny Dashwood may be a miner character in Sense and Sensibility she plays a big part in trying to detour the happiness of those around her.

I think the best examples I could give of this are from quotes in Chapter Two of said novel.
These passages are showcasing her greed and lack of morals
 "Well, then, let something be done for them; but that something need not be three thousand pounds.  Consider, she added, that when the money is once parted with, it can never be returned.  Your sisters will marry, and it will be gone for ever.  If indeed, it could be restored to our little boy..."
 OR

"Yes; and the set of breakfast china is twice as handsome as what belongs in this house.  A great deal too handsome, in my opinion, for any place they could ever afford to live in.  But, however, so it is.  Your father thought only of them.  And I must say this: that you owe no particular gratitude to him, nor attention to his wishes, for we very well know that if he could, he would have left almost everything in the world to them."
 These are just a few examples of her manipulation.  There is also that nasty business about her brother Edward basicly being too good for most women in the area.  Although, I won't touch on that as I find myself tuning into Mrs. Dashwood when concerning my brother.

Book Blogger Hop 6/18


It's Friday! Time for another Book Blogger Hop hosted by Jennifer at Crazy for Books The Hop is designed to discover great book bloggers and be discovered yourself. Not only can we discover new blogs but great books to add to the ever growing wish-list. So hop on over and join the fun!
 
For those of you that are new to She Is Too  Fond Of Books, I'm Whitney and started this book blog at the beginning of the year due to my intense love of books and needed a place to contain it all.  I think of my reading habits as an appetizer sample platter.  I'll try any genre once, but I usually gravitate towards the bread basket or mozzarella sticks, or in other words, classics and fiction.

The content on my blog includes, reviews, book challenges or memes or random bookish thoughts that pop into my head; and recently I started a weekly installment called Femme Fatale Fridays

So happy hopping everyone!

June 17, 2010

Character Connection: Lucy Pevensie

The Introverted Reader is hosting a weekly meme entitle Character Connection
We all have characters we love. Let's spotlight these fantastic creations! Whether you want to be friends with them or you have a full-blown crush on them, you know you love them and want everyone else to love them too!


First off, Lucy Pevensie from the Chronicles of Narnia is just adorable.  Her vivid imagination and determination leads her and three older siblings into the magical world of Narnia.   I believe the Lucy has the kindest heart acknowledging all that Mr. Tumnus did for her and risking danger to save him from the White Witch.  Father Christmas gives her a vial with magical cordial which can heel any injury.  This turns Lucy into a Florence Nightingale of sorts, and we know how highly she was thought of.

In Prince Caspian she is the first to see Aslan return but the other children write it off as an overactive imagination; of course she is proven correct showing that she is the most loyal through and through.  Lastly, in Prince Caspian it is divulged that Lucy is Peter's favorite sister.  Being the High King's fav is cool all by itself.  Long Live Queen Lucy the Valiant!

June 16, 2010

Wuthering Heights Wednesday Week 11

Wuthering Heights Wednesday is all about the Wuthering Heights Read-along hosted by Jill at Fizzy Thoughts with each week we will read three chapters from the classic novel and then post our thoughts on, you guessed it --Wednesday!

Volume II Chapters 17-20
Synopsis:
Heathcliff dies and Hareton and Cathy II fall in love and make merry music together.

My Thoughts:
I really liked this book, but thought it lacked something to be desired.  Yeah, Heathcliff dies but considering how he tortured those around him starving himself to death seemed like the easy way out.  As for Hareton and Cathy, I'm always surprised they "hooked up" especially after past behaviors.  I guess people tend to grow on you, and that there are  no other eligible bachelors left in the moors...

Although, I must say the last line in the novel is by far my favorite:

"And wondered how anyone could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quite earth."

Also, I finished this book a while ago so here is my full review

June 15, 2010

Cranford Read-Along Part One

Allie at A Literary Odyssey is hosting a Cranford Read-Along in two parts.  Today being part one, discussing Chapters 1-8

Elizabeth Gaskell's novel Cranford is a witty piece of Victorian literature, with the town Cranford being based off of Knutsford in Cheshire.  Cranford is not so much a novel than a series of short stories which all seem to intertwine, making this chapters very easy to put down and fall back easily into the town of Cranford with it's eclectic characters and antics.

I think my favorite story is that of Peter Jenkyns, Matty and Deborah's long lost brother.  Peter is what you would call a "juvenile delinquent" of that time.  Dressing in woman's clothing, sauntering around town to see if people will notice and tricking his father into explaining his sermons to an apparently interested young lady.  Eventually, Peter is found out and flogged in public by his father.  Due to this embarrassment Peter disappears  becoming a wandering traveler of sorts before joining the militia;  letting his whereabouts  be know to his family only to disappear again.  I think the reason I enjoyed this story is because it does show the good and the bad, with a chain reaction to one parent's actions.

Another favorite of mine was Lady Glenmire's visit and the girls of Cranford in a tizzy over how to behave.  I pictured something like a Marx Brothers movie and Faulty Towers colliding. I could totally see Groucho giving the dog cream and the guests milk.    

Lastly, I love that the narrator is an outsider from the town  who can give an unbiased telling of these stories.  I live in a small town as well and am not considered to be "from here" as I didn't grow up in the community so sometimes feel like an outsider myself.  Therefore I appreciated our narrator's take on the village of Cranford.

June 13, 2010

The HUGE TBR Readathon


Okay, I obviously love to read, filling my free time during the week doing just that.  So when I stumbled upon The Huge TBR Readathon hosted by Kristen at Bookworming in the 21st Century it really seemed like a no-brainer. 

Another reason why this event peaked my interest is because I am visiting my brother in St. Louis this week, so I can either read for five hours each way, or look at corn fields.  Decisions, decisions...

When: Monday June 14th 8 am (whatever time zone you are in) until Sunday, June 20th - midnight!
Where: Here! Or on your own blog.
What do I have to do? Read, read read. I'm not doing any special activities, but if you're reading this week, join on in.

The Lion, The Witch And The Wardrobe

Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy Pevensie walk into a seemingly ordinary wardrobe and into the world of Narina.  Narnia inhabits, fauns, giants, dwarfs and a plethora of talking animals.  It is here that the children go on a miraculous adventure teaming  with the great Lion Aslan defeating the White Witch and set peace in this magical world.

I loved this book growing up and still enjoyed it now.  I think this is because it has the fantasy element for children but has a religious undertone as well.  It has been greatly debated whether Aslan is to represent Christ.  Edmund, who when first entering Narnia was put under at trance by the White Queen betraying those near to him.  Aslan, sacrifices himself to save the boy dying on the stone table by his enemy.  It has been thought that this was to  symbolize Christ's crucifixion.

On a lighter note, readers cannot help falling into the world of Narnia; with a cast of colorful characters, treachery and good rising over evil it is with sadness to close this book and depart from the Pevensie children and the land of Narnia.

June 11, 2010

Premio Dardos Award

 "The Premio Dardos is a way to acknowledge the importance of bloggers committed to spreading cultural, ethical, literary and personal values, showing their letters and words."

Both Kate at Kate's Library and Book Quoter at a thousand Books with Quotes  and Vaishnavi at Dust Jacket have bestowed upon me the Premio Dardos Award 


"The Premio Dardos is a way to acknowledge the importance of bloggers committed to spreading cultural, ethical, literary and personal values, showing their letters and words."


Now for 5 worthy bloggers:
  1. The Plum Bean Project
  2. Literary Musings
  3. A Literary Odyssey 
  4. A Love for Literature
  5. The Reading Life




Book Blogger Hop 6/11


It's Friday! Time for another Book Blogger Hop hosted by Jennifer at Crazy for Books The Hop is designed to discover great book bloggers and be discovered yourself. Not only can we discover new blogs but great books to add to the ever growing wish-list. So hop on over and join the fun!

Femme Fatale Fridays: Caroline Bingley

"A Femme Fatale, translating to "Deadly Woman" in french, is an alluring, seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire. Often this leads them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations." ~ Wikipedia

 I first discovered this class of women from 1930s and 40s film noir several years ago and was seduced by their charm and cunning minds.  I then began to see them popping up in novels I read, even my favorites like Gone with the Wind and Wuthering Heights.  This  weekly post is to highlight/celebrate/condemn these sultry and conniving ladies in literature.


Elizabeth Bennet, who may not be a good judge of character with men is very severe upon her sex.  On her first meeting she proclaims Miss Bingley (and Mrs. Hurst) as "Very fine ladies; not deficient in good-humour when they were pleased, nor in the power of being agreeable where they chose it; but proud and conceited."  

To be quite honest, Elizabeth hit the nose on the head.  Miss.  Bingley has her heart set on wedding Mr. Darcy and his younger sister Georgiana to her brother Charles.  In doing so sabotages or provokes these men as often as she sees fit.  With Darcy, she teases him about someone's "fine eyes", but in the next breath asks him to say hello to his sister for her.  

As for her own brother, she deceives him by not mentioning that Jane is in London. During a visit to Miss Bennet, she implies that his affections truly lie with Miss Darcy and may quit Netherfield all together.  This is matchmaking of the worst sort.

Although, in her defense,  she did try to warn Elizabeth of Wickham's true character, so she does have her moments.

June 9, 2010

Wuthering Heights Wednesday Week 10

Wuthering Heights Wednesday is all about the Wuthering Heights Read-along hosted by Jill at Fizzy Thoughts with each week we will read three chapters from the classic novel and then post our thoughts on, you guessed it --Wednesday!

Volume 2 Chapters 14-16
Synopsis:
Cathy Jr and Linton are forced into matrimony.  Edgar finally dies, (you know it had to happen).  Linton also dies, but who gives a shit about that anyway?  Lastly, with these two out of the way Heathcliff inherits the Linton fortune reaching his life long goal.

My Thoughts:
Heathcliff does have a moment where he kind of cares, leaving off Cathy for a time after Linton's death; but that is very short lived.  We only have so many characters left, with the only one I really care about being  Hareton.

Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

Author: Jane Austen
Original Publication Date: 1811
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Source: Bought
Add To: Goodreads

Marianne Dashwood wears her heart on her sleeve, and when she falls in love with the dashing but unsuitable John Willoughby she ignores her sister Elinor's warning that her impulsive behaviour leaves her open to gossip and innuendo. Meanwhile Elinor, always sensitive to social convention, is struggling to conceal her own romantic disappointment, even from those closest to her. Through their parallel experience of love - and its threatened loss - the sisters learn that sense must mix with sensibility if they are to find personal happiness in a society where status and money govern the rules of love. ~ Goodreads

Sense and Sensibility is a novel of the Dashwoods. Mrs. Dashwood, a silly women focused on acquiring a comfertable fortune and abode along with marrying off her daughters well.  Elinor, a very sensible girl who always does the logical or right thing. Marianne who unlike her sister follows her heart and lives in the moment.  She is also overly emotional and a drama queen which gets her into trouble.  Lastly, there is the youngest sister Margaret who is yet to be developed.

After the death of Mr. Dashwood the estate is passed to the next male heir, John Dashwood his son from a previous marriage.  Before his father's death John promises to take care of his Step-Mother and Sisters but like so many money gets in the way, along with a greedy wife.  He is eventually convinced to give the girls less than they probably deserve. Eventuality, after realizing that neither Mrs. Dashwood can stand each others company any longer they move to Barton Cottage.

Elinor, while not as entertaining as her sister is more thoughtful and is a better confidante, and when her love interest is just out of hands reach it pulls at your heartstrings.  Marianne on the other side is still hung up on a previous love and sometimes wonder if she ever really let go; even after her marriage.  Although, I think Sense and Sensibility still has a fulfilling ending.    

In classic Austen, we have our fair share of love triangles, scandal, a sense of entitlement and don't forget the sexy bad boys and noble gentlemen competing for our heroine's affections.  Sense and Sensibility invokes so many emotions, from love and compassion to empathy and astonishment, so that it's hard to put down.







June 7, 2010

48 Hour Book Challenge: The Finish Line


Well that's it folks, that's a wrap!  The 48 hour Book Challenge has ended as with a blissful weekend of reading.  I also apologize for the tardiness of this post but Blogger has not been kind to me so was unable to post till now.

Final Stats
Started: Friday, 11:30 am
Finished: Sunday, 11 am 
Books Read: Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Pages Read: 312
Hours Read: 18
Hours Slept: 16
Hours Blogging: 5
Breaks: 6
Caffeine Intake:  5 Cups of tea and 1 coke

June 5, 2010

48 Hour Book Challenge: Day Two


Several years ago my aunt went to a party hosted by a couple of gourmet chefs.  Determined to impress them decided to make a dessert-- Death by Chocolate.  My aunt began baking the cake the day of the party; while the cake was in the oven she turned the page and to much horror read DAY TWO.

Apparently, the cake was suppose to be refrigerated for 24 hours before adding the icing.  With the party being that evening only a few hours would have to do.  When Death by Chocolate was done with the icing added, it looked more like a Chocolate Lava Cake gone wrong.

Unlike my dear aunt, I knew to turn the page and am starting my own DAY TWO.

Stats
Currently Reading: Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Pages Read: 100
Hours Slept: 8
Hours Read: 10
Hours Blogging: 3
Caffeine Intake: 2 cups of tea 
Breaks:3

June 4, 2010

48 Hour Book Challenge: The Starting Line

I'm so excited to be participating in my first 48 Hour Book Challenge hosted by MotherReader   I'll try to check in regularly or when ever my eyes need a rest.  So with my collection of Jane Austen and a cup of tea by my side, I'm ready to start reading!

Starting Line: Friday: 9:30 a.m. 11: 30 a friend came by unexpectedly and didn't have the heart to say "Go away I'm reading!"
Currently Reading: Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Pages Read: 156
Hours Read: 8
Hours Blogging: 2
Breaks: two 30 minute breaks for groceries and dishes & one 3 hour break for dinner and movie with family.
Caffeine Intake: 3 cups of tea and 1 coke

June 3, 2010

48 Hour Read-A-Thon

"In vain I have struggled.  It will not do."  so with this quote from Pride and Prejudice and a stack of Jane Austen novels by my side I join the 48 Hour Book Challenge hosted by MotherReader 

Here's the deal:
  1. The weekend is June 4–6, 2010. Read and blog for any 48-hour period within the Friday-to-Monday-morning window. Start no sooner than 7:00 a.m. on Friday the fourth and end no later than 7:00 a.m. Monday the seventh. So, go from 7:00 p.m. Friday to 7:00 p.m. on Sunday... or maybe 7:00 a.m. Saturday to 7:00 a.m. Monday works better for you. But the 48 hours do need to be in a row. That said, during that 48-hour period you may still have gaps of time in which you can’t read, and that’s fine. (In the middle of the three different challenge weekends I’ve had to go to work, attend a ballet recital, and drive for a Girl Scout event.)
  2. The books should be about fifth-grade level and up. Adult books are fine, especially if adult book bloggers want to play. If you are generally a picture book blogger, consider this a good time to get caught up on all those wonderful books you’ve been hearing about. Graphic novels can be included in the reading. One audiobook can also be included in your time and book total.
  3. The top three winners will be based only on time commitment, not number of books. So if you are heading into the 30+ hours club or 40+ hours club, track your time carefully. International winners may be given gift cards instead books due to mailing costs, unless a U.S. address is provided.
  4. It’s your call as to how much you want to put into it. If you want to skip sleep and showers to do this — and some people do — go for it. If you want to be a bit more laid back, fine. But you have to put something into it or it’s not a challenge. Twelve hours is the benchmark for winning prizes.
  5. The length of the reviews or notes written in your blog are not an issue. You can write a sentence, a paragraph, or a full-length review. Up to you. The time spent reviewing counts in your total time.
  6. New last year: You can include some amount of time reading other participant’s blogs, commenting on participating blogs and Facebook pages, and Twittering about your progress (remember the #48hbc tag!). For every five hours, you can add one hour of networking. This time counts in your total time.
  7. On your blog, state when you are starting the challenge with a specific entry on that day and leave the link to that post at the Starting Line post at MotherReader on June 4th (via the trusty Mr. Linky).
  8. When you finish, write a final summary that clearly indicates hours — including partial hours — you spent reading/reviewing/networking, the number of books read, and any other comments you want to make on the experience. It needs to be posted no later than noon EST on Monday, June 7th. Also, check in at the Finish Line post on MotherReader that will be posted Sunday and please link to that post from your final summary post.

Femme Fatale Fridays: Lydia Bennet


"A Femme Fatale, translating to "Deadly Woman" in french, is an alluring, seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire. Often this leads them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations." ~ Wikipedia

 I first discovered this class of women from 1930s and 40s film noir several years ago and was seduced by their charm and cunning minds.  I then began to see them popping up in novels I read, even my favorites like Gone with the Wind and Wuthering Heights.  This new weekly post is to highlight/celebrate/condemn these sultry and conniving ladies in literature.

Lydia Bennet is the youngest of the Bennet girls at the age of fifteen.  She starts off as one of the silliest girls but in time grows to be one of the biggest flirts, hitting on any officer who sets foot inside the town of Merryton.  Lydia is constently described as being headstrong and frivolous who goes about life as if it were one big party.  Lydia also has her sister Kitty following her around where ever she may go, while setting a horrible example for a role model. Excluding her mother who says she is a free spirited girl, Lydia is an embarrassment.  This doesn't even cover her elopement (which is a civilized way of saying slept together) with Mr. George Wickham.

"My Dearest, Harriet,
You will laugh when you know where I have gone, and I cannot help laughing myself at your surprise to-morrow morning, as soon as I am missed.  I am going to Gretna Green, and if you cannot guess with who, I shall think you a simpleton, for there is but one man in the world I love, and he is an angel.  I should never be happy without him, so think it no harm to be off.  You need not send them word at Longbourn of my going, if you do not like it, for it will make the surprise the greater when I write to them, and sign my name Lydia Wickham.  What a good joke it will be!  I can hardly write for laughing.  Pray make my excuses to Pratt for not keeping my engagement, and dancing with him to-night.  Tell him I hope he will excuse me when he knows all, and tell him I will dance with him at the next ball we meet with great pleasure. I shall send for my clothes when I get to Longbourn; but I wish you would tell Sally to mend a great slit in my worked muslin gown before they are packed up.  Good-bye.  Give my love to Colonel Forster.  I hope you will drink to our good journey.
Your Affectionate Friend,
Lydia Bennet"   

A Long Fatal Love Chase


A Long Fatal Love Chase, Vol. 2Author: Louisa May Alcott
Originally Written: 1866
Publication Date: 1995 
Publisher: Random House
Source: Library
Add To: Goodreads
One stormy night, a brooding stranger appears in her remote island home, ready to take Rosamond to her word. Spellbound by the mysterious Philip Tempest, Rosamond is seduced with promises of love and freedom, then spirited away on Tempest's sumptuous yacht. But she soon finds herself trapped in a web of intrigue, cruelty, and deceit. Desperate to escape, she flees to Italy, France, and Germany, from Parisian garret to mental asylum, from convent to chateau, as Tempest stalks every step of the fiery beauty who has become his obsession.

A story of dark love and passionate obsession that was considered "too sensational" to be published in the authors lifetime, A Long Fatal Love Chase was written for magazine serialization in 1866, two years before the publication of Little Women. Buried among Louisa May Alcott's papers for more than a century, its publication is a literary landmark—a novel that is bold, timeless, and mesmerizing." ~ Amazon

"I'd gladly sell my soul to Satan for a year of freedom," exclaims Rosamond Vivian. Until one night an unannounced stranger comes to her island, stealing her heart and whisking her away from her home. Rosamond and her now husband Philip Tempest, live a peaceful and happy first year until a mysterious lady appears at their doorstep divulging some unknown information about Phillip which turns Rosamond's heart cold causing her to flee.

From here continues a cat and mouse chase with Phillip seeking her out giving no moments worth of peace. This may be horrible but I am going to compare Miss Alcott's work to Looney Tunes. Not that it is necessarily funny but the two do remind me of Elmer Fudd and Bugs Bunny. Tempest stocking around "Be very, very quite, we're hunting Wabbits" Or Wosamond... And while Bugs Bunny may pop up unexpectedly in a humorous way she is found unexpectedly in the most unusual places.

I found A Long Fatal Love Chase to be a very entertaining read. While this book did get a little repetitive (although the title should have given it away) I enjoyed reading of the unexpected persona's the two took to hide their identities even if both were for different reasons; and also when and were Tempest would pop up. One thing that I found sad about this book was that the couple still loved each other deeply. Although, Rosamond refused to express these emotions due to her husband's past, and tempest's affection had turned violent.

On a last note, Louisa May Alcott died in 1888 with this book being thought of as too risky for her lifetime so was not published until 1995 over a century after her death. The sad thing about this, is that A Long Fatal Love Chase would be considered tame by today's standards.







June 2, 2010

Wuthering Heights Wednesday Week 9

Wuthering Heights Wednesday is all about the Wuthering Heights Read-along hosted by Jill at Fizzy Thoughts with each week we will read three chapters from the classic novel and then post our thoughts on, you guessed it --Wednesday!

Volume 2 Chapters 9-13
Synopsis:
Edgar's cold has not improved and he is starting to face reality and think of death.  Perhaps he has gone crazy with his illness but has consented Cathy to see Linton again.  At first Cathy is ecstatic with the proposal but after meeting with her cousin again sees him for the sickly, winy, demanding brat we saw him as from the beginning.  Heathcliff convinces Cathy and Nelly (who watches them like a hawk) to return once more, upon which he barricades them in like Rapunzel in her tower, only Cathy's hair isn't long enough to make an escape.  Heathcliff's master plan in all this is to force the two love birds into marriage to claim the Earnshaw fortune after Edgar's death.  Conveniently, Linton doesn't seem long for this world either.

My Thoughts:
I'm starting to think Nelly is the true evil-doer here.  She knows of Heathcliff's ill demeanor but yet sits back and watches it all happen.  Edgar seems to be a very uninvolved parent as well.  Heathcliff on the other hand, has a very obsessive personality and I think he would have been diagnosed as having OCD now.  Cathy and Linton are just plain stupid.  

June 1, 2010

Jane in June


Jane in June is finally here!  Misty at Book Rat has really put some elbow grease into this event and is filled with a myriad of all things Jane this month.  My plan is to read Jane's novels in the order that they were published.  I'm not guaranteeing that I'll get to them all but this is my plan. 
  1. Sense and Sensibility (1811)
  2. Pride and Prejudice (1813)
  3. Mansfield Park (1814)
  4. Emma (1815)
  5. Northanger Abbey (1817)
  6. Persuasion (1817)