Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Prom and Prejudice


Prom and Prejudice
Lizzie Bennet, who attends Longbourn Academy on scholarship, isn't exactly interested in designer dresses and expensive shoes, but her best friend, Jane, might be—especially now that Charles Bingley is back from a semester in London. Lizzie is happy about her friend's burgeoning romance, but less than impressed by Will Darcy, a pompous jerk who looks down on the middle class. So imagine Lizzie's surprise when Will asks her to the prom! Will Lizzie's pride and Will's prejudice keep them apart? Or are they a prom couple in the making? 

I consider myself to be a purest and dare I say prejudice when it comes to Jane Austen, particularly Pride and Prejudice, so when I received a copy of Elizabeth Eulberg's Prom and Prejudice I had my reservations.  Within  the first chapter Lizzie Bennet had charmed her way into my heart and her stubborn determination refused to let go.  True, and undoubtedly the novel was still modernized but in a very classy way, Jane and Lydia never used the word "like" twenty times in one sentence and Will Darcy was no gangster with his pants falling down to his knees (all horrible teenage trends).  To be honest, my only complaint was with George Wickham, mainly because he had been dubbed the nickname "Wick"  maybe it's the Austen snob in me but I think Wickham roles off the tongue nicer; nevertheless George "Wick" Wickham is a conniving vile creature that the reader loves to hate.  Prom and Prejudice is a cute retelling of a timeless classic for anyone who has been through the evils of high school and the tribulation of choosing a prom dress


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Additional Information:
Title: Prom and Prejudice
Author: Elizabeth Eulberg
Publisher: Point
Publication Date: January 4, 2011

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I received a copy from the publisher in exchange for a honest review

1 comment:

  1. Wickham is a wonderful character we all love to hate! I haven't read too many P&P adaptations lately and think I'm overdue. This sounds cute -- glad you enjoyed it!

    ReplyDelete

"It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples."

It is your turn to say something now dear readers, thank you for stopping by.