Friday, May 27, 2011

The Phantom Tollbooth


The Phantom Tollbooth
After a very boring day at school, Milo comes home to discover a tollbooth in his bedroom.  Via this phantom ride he finds "The Land Beyond and sets out on a quest to rescue the princesses Rhyme and Reason while meeting many interesting characters along the way.

This has been labeled as a modern classic filled with word play being compared to the likes of Alice in Wonderland and the Wizard of Oz.  I'd say this was all correct.   Milo, like Dorthy meets many strange characters on his way to Dictionopolis such as Tock, the watchdog and The Humbug, an over sized insect.  The premise of The Phantom Tollbooth is to rescue Princesses Rhyme and Reason from The Castle In The Sky restoring peace to the land of Wisdom.  This reminded me very much of Mario rescuing Princess Toadstool,dodging the likes of King Koopa along the way.  The ending I found interesting, as the Tollbooth disappears as magically as it appeared almost as if it thought Milo had learned enough from his experience.

I think I'm a little prejudice here because I grew up with Harry Potter and in my mind, nothing can top that.  Well, I was right.  The Phantom Tollbooth has been labeled as a modern classic filled with word play being compared to the likes of Alice in Wonderland and the Wizard of Oz. I just didn't see it. Yes, there was word play that a younger reader may not have picked up on but the story and the hero, Milo didn't jump out at me and I walked away from the book with no opinion on it one way or another. Granted, I had never heard of The Phantom Tollbooth before if it hadn't been for book club but if left to my own devises wouldn't have given it a second glance.


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1 comment:

  1. Oh I remember reading this in primary school (hmm 25 years ago now) so it just barely qualifies as modern LOl. I do remember I enjoyed it though but Harry Potter is way better

    Shelleyrae @ Book'd Out
    www.bookdout.wordpress.com

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